Click on a subject to see examples of how plant-related science and garden activities support the National Standards Scope-and-Sequence of Teaching and Learning.


Subjects : Math : Social Studies : Geography : Reading/English/Language Arts


Math

Kindergarten

  • Measuring the schoolyard garden, both before and after construction, with various non-standard units (hand-widths, arm-lengths, etc.).
  • Identifying shapes in the garden.
  • Recording the daily temperature on a classroom chart.

Grade 1
  • Measuring the schoolyard garden both before and after construction with non-standard and standard units.
  • Identifying two- and three-dimensional shapes in the garden.
  • Collecting data on daily temperature in the garden and recording it on a classroom chart.
  • Recognizing patterns in the garden.

Grade 2
  • Measuring the garden in metric units.
  • Dividing garden beds to gain understanding of simple fractions.
  • Measuring the daily temperature and recording it.
  • Identifying symmetry and asymmetry in the garden.

Grade 3
  • Measuring the perimeter and area of the garden.
  • Measuring temperature of air and soil in the garden.
  • Diving garden beds into fractional units.
  • Identifying geometric shapes and concepts in the garden.

Grade 4
  • Measuring the garden and creating a map to scale.
  • Identifying geometric shapes and concepts in the garden.
  • Using the garden measurements to demonstrate fractions and decimals.
  • Create a graph to illustrate data from plant studies, such as a bar graph to show the number of seedlings that sprout or a line graph to show the growth of a plant over time.

Grade 5
  • Measure perimeter and area of the garden using metric units.
  • Calculate the volume of soil in a plant bed.
  • Create graphs to illustrate data from plant studies in the garden.
  • Identify geometric shapes and concepts in the garden.

Grade 6
  • Measure the garden; calculate the volume of soil in a garden plot.
  • Observe a plant over time and graph its growth over time.
  • Solve story/word problems related to the garden.

Grade 7
  • Measure and calculate perimeter, area, surface area, and volume of garden beds.
  • Create graphs to show data collected from experiments in the garden.
  • Identify geometric shapes and concepts in the garden.

Grade 8
  • Perform experiments in the garden, collect numerical data, and create a graph.
  • Identify geometric shapes and concepts in the garden.
  • Practice various measuring techniques in the garden.

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Social Studies

Kindergarten
  • Identifying garden plants that are used or have been used by various cultures.
  • Relate folk tales, fables, and myths to the garden.
  • While discussing family roles of various cultures, highlight agriculture and/or gardening practices.

Grade 1
  • Relate legends, myths, stories, and fables to the garden.
  • Apply what is learned about rules of conduct and work to behavior in the garden.
  • Relate study of elements of culture to the plants and activities in the school garden; grow plants used by various cultures.

Grade 2
  • Apply rules of conduct, rights and responsibilities to behavior in the school garden.
  • Introduce botanical/garden/agricultural details into study of the diversity of backgrounds of Americans; grow plants from other cultures in your school garden.
  • Use the garden to illustrate simple economic concepts.

Grade 3
  • Highlight gardens, plants, agriculture, and nature in study of cultural diversity. Grow plants from theses cultures in the school garden.
  • Consider how inventions and new developments in agriculture have influenced gardening practices used in the school garden.

Grade 4
  • Use the garden to illustrate economic concepts such as effects of supply and demand.
  • Grow plants from Africa and Asia.

Grade 5
  • Discuss botanical/agricultural contributions by various cultures and grow some of the plants discussed.

Grade 6
  • Use the garden to illustrate economic concepts such as effects of supply and demand.
  • Grow plants from Africa and Asia.

Grade 7
  • Investigate how agricultural discoveries and inventions changed daily life and affect practices in the school garden.
  • Grow plants farmed or used by indigenous people.

Grade 8
  • Investigate plants used by various Western Hemisphere civilizations; grow some examples.

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Geography

Kindergarten
  • Compare a simple map of the garden to the actual garden.
  • Create and identify symbols to represent features on the garden map.

Grade 1
  • Compare a map of the garden to the actual garden.
  • Use a map legend to identify features on the garden map.
  • Observe the weather and seasons effect on the garden.

Grade 2
  • Create simple maps of the school garden.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal changes in the garden.

Grade 3
  • Create map of school garden using relative locations: distance, scale, and map symbols.
  • Discuss the neighborhood and/or community involvement in the school garden.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal changes in the garden.

Grade 4
  • Create a scale map of the school garden.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal changes in the garden. Discuss their impact on the school garden.
  • Use the garden to describe interaction of climate, weather, soil, and natural vegetation.

Grade 5
  • Highlight crops and other plants that moved with human migrations; grow some examples.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal change in the garden; compare this to historical patterns.

Grade 6
  • Highlight crops and other plants that have influenced growth and decline of empires, political policy, and other human activities; grow some examples.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal change in the garden; compare this to historical patterns.

Grade 7
  • Highlight crops and other plants that have human activities across the globe; grow some examples.
  • Collect data on weather and seasonal change in the garden; compare this to historical patterns.

Grade 8
  • Discuss the effect of climate on vegetation as it relates to the school garden.
  • Use the school garden as an example when discussing patterns of land use.

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Reading | English | Language Arts

Kindergarten
  • Reading children’s literature on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Exercises in following directions when planting or caring for the garden.

Grade 1
  • Reading children’s literature on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Writing and talking about the garden; asking questions about what is happening in the school garden.

Grade 2
  • Reading children’s literature on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Writing and talking about the garden; asking questions about what is happening in the school garden.

Grade 3
  • Reading children’s literature on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Writing and talking about the garden; asking questions about what is happening in the school garden.

Grade 4
  • Reading children’s literature, both fiction and nonfiction on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Writing and talking about the garden; giving a written or oral report on the garden.

Grade 5
  • Reading children’s literature, both fiction and nonfiction on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Identifying literary devices in such literature.
  • Writing and talking about the garden; giving a written or oral report on the garden.

Grade 6
  • Reading literature, both fiction and nonfiction on plants, gardens, or nature.
  • Identifying literary devices in such literature.
  • Communicating about plans and tasks in the garden; making group decisions.

Grade 7
  • Reading literature on plants, gardens, or nature – including a selection of folk tales, fables, and parables, and multi-ethnic literature.
  • Writing a report or a research paper on a garden-related theme.
  • Communicating about plans and tasks in the garden; making group decisions.
  • Group presentations on a garden-related theme.

Grade 8
  • Relating Greek and Roman mythology to the garden.
  • Writing a research report on a garden-related theme.
  • Individual and group presentation on garden-related themes.

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